Hawaii Supreme Court Achieves a Higher Caliber of Juris-Stupid

Hawaii Supreme Court Achieves a Higher Caliber of Juris-Stupid

By Steve Pomper Hawaii Supreme Court (Aliiolani Hale 2011 by Don Ramey Logan.jpg, Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0) You’re a child playing a game and some kids break the rules they don’t like. Would you play with them again? Could you ever trust them? Now, read on and tell me the difference between the Hawaii Supreme Read more »

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Regulating Ghost Guns

By Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D Before we look at the literal nuts and bolts of the gun business, let us pause for a brief history lesson. In 1791 the fledgling United States of America had bills to pay left over from the War of Independence. One revenue source was a tax on alcohol and Read more »

Posted in Law

Lawsuits Drive Training and Policy

By Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D The professionalization of law enforcement became solidified in the 1970s when U.S. states developed certification standards for police officers. Some were active before then and some states took longer. The minimum academy training hours vary widely with standards for hiring generally up to each individual agency. The reason for Read more »

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You Have the Right to Remain Silent

By Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D One of the guilty pleasures in my early days working in the same college town where I was a young officer was arresting criminal justice students. There was something about having taken a few classes that made many of them have the confidence of a seasoned attorney. More than Read more »

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Civil Responsibilities and Civic Duties

By Chief Joel F. Shults, Ed.D There is so much talk about law enforcement that the average citizen may think all justice must flow first through the badge. The police establishment has long been the gateway for a myriad of services beyond the mere enforcement of statutes and continues to be the first call of Read more »

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The Birthplace of the American Revolution Has Abandoned It

By Steve Pomper “The Lexington Minuteman,” Lexington, Massachusetts When it comes to chasing cops out of the profession, despite putting their communities at grave risk, anti-cop/anti-self-defense/anti-gun legislators in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts take a backseat to no one. And, originally from Mass. but currently residing in Washington State, I know what it’s like to live in Read more »

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Mental Health Civil Commitment Laws Must Adapt for Public Safety

By Steve Pomper As a cop in Washington State, I had the authority place people with mental health issues into an involuntary commitment hold for a psychological evaluation. But only if the person was a danger to self or others. This standard was intended to correctly balance a person’s liberty with public safety. However, as I quickly Read more »

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How Anti-Second Amendment Activists’ Surveys Skew Results

By Steve Pomper Radical gun control efforts against law-abiding citizens affect law enforcement officers in many ways. One way is when people aren’t allowed to exercise their Second Amendment self-defense rights, cops are the ones who must investigate the gruesome crime scenes after some murderer shoots up an unarmed family.  There are places where the government Read more »

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Competing and Conflicting Federal and State Laws Not Fair to Law Enforcement Officers

By Steve Pomper Gov. Mike Parson, former Polk County sheriff and U.S. Army MP My basic understanding, if somewhat simplified, of the federal-state balance regarding the U.S. Constitution’s supremacy clause is states can pass laws to provide more but not less protection than the federal Constitution provides, including the unalienable right to life and to defend that life.   As explained by Thoughtco, Read more »

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